Library AAC http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/ RSS Feed Library AAC en-gb SUB Göttingen Wed, 11 Dec 2019 18:24:59 +0100 Wed, 11 Dec 2019 18:24:59 +0100 TYPO3 EXT:news news-249 Thu, 05 Dec 2019 11:40:10 +0100 William Blake Exhibition at TATE Britain and The William Blake Archive http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/william-blake-exhibition-at-tate-britain-and-the-william-blake-archive/ Check out the TATE Digital Archive and the William Blake Archive. In September 2019 TATE Britain opened a large exhibition of William Blake’s works. With more than three hundred items on display, it is the largest show of the visionary artist’s oeuvre for almost twenty years. The scale of the event was recently exemplified by a spectacular projection illuminating St. Paul’s Cathedral with Blake's work “The Ancient of Days” (1794) that honored the occasion of his 262nd birthday on Nov. 28th (read more about it in the Guardian). The exhibition is open until February 2., so do not miss out on this exceptional opportunity, if you are in London.

For those of you who cannot make it to London, we would like to introduce you to TATE’s digital archive that holds more than 52.000 items, which can be viewed online and also includes many digital reproductions of William Blake’s works. The archive focuses on “documenting the history of fine art practice in the UK” and its scope exceeds mere art objects, but also includes such material as “letters, writings, sketchbooks, audio-visual material, photographs, ephemera, press cuttings and objects.” As such, it presents a valuable trove of sources for art historians and researchers with a focus on Great Britain. The digitized section is only a fraction of the TATE Archive that describes itself as “the world’s largest archive of British art," and the majority of its materials can only be accessed on site. During a five-year program called Archives & Access, the collection has been supplemented by a series of digital tools that support its exploration and the research of its objects. Additionally, the program also included the development and implementation of measures to foster outreach, education, and participation.

The digital reproductions of William Blake’s works in the TATE Archive are available as low resolution images through a CC-BY-NC-ND (3.0 Unported) license. Given their date of origin, the majority of William Blake’s works are available in the public domain and there are many libraries and websites that provide digitized versions of his texts and reproductions of the plates. Still, William Blake’s work is unique in its complex interrelation of text, image, and the underlying technologies of production, reproduction and editing. Not every digital archive is able to account for this intermedial complexity to the full extent. The most comprehensive and state­-of-the-art digital archive that documents William Blake’s oeuvre is The William Blake Archive hosted by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and sponsored by the Library of Congress, the University of Rochester, and the Scholarly Editions and Translations Division of the National Endowment for the Humanities. This archive has been an ongoing project since 1996 and has evolved into a cutting edge resource that provides a variety of digital research tools (e.g. lightbox, transcription, full-text search) and meticulous documentation of its holdings (provenance, full editorial information). It includes the complete Illuminated Books, commercial book illustrations, and various other visual works and manuscripts of the artist. The collection is being updated continuously and you can subscribe to the archive’s newsletter to stay informed about current additions.

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American Studies Australian & New Zealand Studies Canadian Studies English / British & Irish Studies
news-246 Fri, 29 Nov 2019 15:15:09 +0100 "Mediating Mountains": AAAS Conference Report http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/mediating-mountains-aaas-conference-report/ Report from the 46th annual conference of the Austrian Association for American Studies (AAAS) From November 22 - 24, the Austrian Association for American Studies (AAAS) held their annual meeting at the University of Innsbruck and invited speakers from Austria, Germany, France, Sweden, and the US to discuss the conference's topic "Mediating Mountains" from various perspectives. Set in the Alpine region of Tyrol, Innsbruck served as the perfect background to explore the many "guises" in which mountains "confront" us, as the organizers stated in their CFP for the conference. Nearly seventy scholars were invited to engage in lively discussions throughout the weekend. In the face of the global climate crisis, the tone of many talks and conversations carried more urgency. Thus, ecocriticism and the critique of the Anthropocene were important undercurrants of this conference.

The title was well chosen for this conference as it can be read in two ways: 1) "Mediating Mountains," i.e. how mountains are mediated by other means such as film, literature, or photography, and 2) "Mediating Mountains," i.e. how mountains' physical and abstract presence mediates our way of thinking about nature, the environment, or history. Having these two interrelated perspectives of how mountains shape our reality opened up the floor for many interdisciplinary discussions.

The Keynotes

Three keynotes explored the way in which mountains are framed and utilized in visual culture, yet placed their respective examples within different historical, ideological, and experiential contexts, thus covering much more ground than their primary texts. Jennifer Peterson, Chair of the Department of Communication at Woodbury University, gave her keynote lecture “Highroads and Skyroads: Cinematic Mountains and the US National Park Service” on Friday afternoon. During her talk, she traced the evolution of the concepts of wilderness, modernity, and the Anthropocene with regards to mountains by analyzing and historicizing informational films about US National Parks in the West that were produced by the US National Park Service and the US Department of the Interior during the 1920s and 1930s. Peterson convincingly outlined the influence of roadbuilding, auto-mobility, and fossil capitalism by framing these films within the dynamics of advertisement and ideas of ‘wilderness’ and recreation—ideas that only emerged outside of nature spaces. The material Peterson presented attested to the tenuous relationship between onscreen nature spaces promising recreation, nature, and freedom on the one hand, and the obsession with technology, mobility, and cars on the other. Promoting automobiles against the backdrop of great mountainous scenery, said Peterson, not only speaks to the historically grown dependence on technology but also to the creation and promotion of recreation in National Parks for the masses.

The effects of these promotional nature films were later illustrated in a screening of four silent films—among them Roads in Our National Parks (1927), Land of the Lofty Mountains (1936), and The Olympus Country (1936)—accompanied on piano by Gregor Blösl. It became clear how these films combined the story of opening up the land via roads with emotional and scenic visuals to create an affective American narrative of conquering the Western wilderness.

In his keynote lecture “Taking Tiger Mountain by Strategy: Two Landscapes of the Anthropocene 1970 and 2014,” Sean Cubitt, professor of Film and Television at Goldsmiths, University of London tries to think about imagination without romanticizing or pathologizing it in order to illustrate that the Anthropocene is a shared, participatory dystopian imagination that is always threatened by the tyranny of the present. By comparing two film adaptations of the traditional Chinese story Tracks in the Snowy Forest, Cubitt investigated how the way in which mountains are imagined on screen has changed over time and what these changes can tell us about the collective imaginary at two important points in time. He linked the CGI-technology of the 2014 movie by Tsui Hark back to the stage props and set paintings of the 1970 movie, in order to point to a continuation of a mechanism that constantly references mountains to imagine the mountains in their symbolic function as projection screens of a collective imagination. And this mechanism, Cubitt concluded, is relentlessly repeated in the Anthropocene.

The final keynote by Sascha Pöhlmann, titled “Thereness: Video Game Mountains as Limits of Interactivity,” concluded the official part of the conference on Sunday. Pöhlmann, who is interim Professor of North American Literature and Culture at the University of Konstanz, conceptualized the mediation of mountains with “thereness” which describes the experiential quality of mountains in video games. Using three mountain-centered games—Celeste (2018), Getting Over It with Bennett Foddy (2017), and Mountain (2014)—he explained how mountains are employed in these games to invite and resist being engaged by humans. Interestingly, you can’t really play with the mountains in these games, nor do they serve as scenic backgrounds or pathos-driven metaphors. The fact that these games put limitations on the power-and-control mechanisms that players have become used to, not only elevates the existence of the mountains to an experience beyond ourselves, Pöhlmann argued, but also offers the opportunity to analyze underlying criticisms of power, consumerism, or social normativity that these limitations evoke.

The Panels

The great variety and quality of the seventeen panels substantiated the benefit of using mountain studies as a lens through which to approach, analyze, historicize, and negotiate North America. The sheer number of contributions and selected talks exemplifies the usefulness of this angle within the American Studies community in Austria, Germany, and beyond. Ranging from different disciplines such as film studies in the panel “Mountain Cinema” to musicology in “Mountains and Music” to social history in “Appalachia: Sacred Space and Spiritual Ecology,” the panel selection spoke to the breadth of scholarly engagement. Panels such as “Ecological Narratives,” “Mountains and Masculinity,” and “Mountains as Figures of Identity” exemplified the productivity of analyzing mountains to explore notions of genre, gender, or identity. Other crucial mountain-related aspects such as femininity, whiteness, American colonialism, the Native American genocide and adjoining considerations of racism, displacement, and social justice, were often implied in Q&As and discussions, yet were not part of the official program. To more fully make use of the academic productivity of mountain scholarship, extra effort should be put to encourage work in these areas.

The panel “Photographic Construction of Mountains” chaired by Ingrid Gessner (Vorarlberg) brought together four perspectives that negotiated mountain photography. Sabine Sielke’s (Bonn) “Revisiting Brokeback Mountain, or: How Mountains Matter” read mountains in Ang Lee’s 2005 film as liminal space for the transgression of norms in which the power of the imaginary—informed by the Western genre as much as by Melodrama—, the visual memory—informed by artists such as Ansel Adams, Edward Hopper, and William Eggleston—, and the repertoire of meaning that mountains symbolize come together to negotiate class, homosexuality, as well as the natural. In her talk “The Power of Collective Vision: Landscape, Visual Media, and the Production of American Mountains,” Danielle Raad (Amherst) reflected upon Jean Baudrillard’s concepts of the Premodern, the Modern, and the Postmodern to investigate how mountain images have been appropriated to fit national narratives, as exemplified by panoramas and stereoscopes. Special focus lay on the way personal experiences are mediated by preformulated images that often exclude alternative conceptions of landscape e.g. by Native Americans or African Americans. Hannah Zindel (Lüneburg) traced the historical impact of alpine ballooning in her talk “Aerial Alps: Balloon Photography and Mountain Modeling in the 19th Century.” She focused on the work of geologist Albert Heim and Eduard Spelterini, balloon captain and photographer, who embarked on numerous balloon flights across the Alps to improve cartography through photographs and reliefs. Ballooning, first undertaken to understand mountains better, facilitated the production of natural reliefs a craft that, as shown, is as much scientific as it is artistic. Discussing Barry Goldwater’s landscape photography of Arizona, Susann Köhler (Göttingen) investigated both of Goldwater’s personas—the politician and the amateur-photographer—in her talk “‘Down the Rugged Canyon Route’”. Reading the photographs against the backdrop of his political career and understanding how the two aspects intersect, shed light on the politics and aesthetics of this conservative politician.

“Building Mountains: Visual Landmarks and Narrative Functions,” the panel on architecture, was chaired by Robert Winkler (Gießen). Unfortunately, Sabrina Mittermeier (Augsburg) could not attend. Therefore, the panelists Julia Lange (Hamburg) and Wiebke Kartheus (Göttingen) were able to expand upon their talks a little bit more and left enough room for a lively discussion afterwards. In her talk “Taking Bauhaus to the Mountains: Capitalism, Modernism, and the Aspen Jet Set,” Lange delineated the history of Bauhaus architecture in the Rocky Mountains and illuminated the question of how Aspen—the mining town-turned-high-class-ski-resort—could become a Mekka for Modernist architecture. As so often in American local history, the vision of an individual, in this case William Paepcke, was the driving force behind a cultural phenomenon. Kartheus followed the trajectories of ongoing architecture projects at the Denver Art Museum and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in her talk “From the Rocky Mountains to the Hollywood Hills” to explore how both institutions implement their surroundings to narrate themselves, their collections, as well as their communities. Pre-formulated imaginaries, she argued, that are activated by the collections themselves or broadly-disseminated images in the media are called-upon by the art museums to place them within the American West, whose art tradition is not as well-established as in the the Eastern part of the country.

During the last session on Sunday morning, the panel “Commodifying Verticality: Symbols, Systems, and Snow” took a systemic approach to explore commercially-driven dynamics surrounding mountains. Carolin Roeder (Berlin) tied commodification to professionalization in mountain climbing during her presentation “How Hard Is Hard? Climbing Grades and the Classification of Verticality in the Twentieth Century.” She explained how understanding the complex notions of difficulty grading can be used as a productive angle to investigate tensions between the individual and the collective, the objective and the subjective, and the global and the local, that were so prevalent in the 20th century. Ultimately, she concluded, the essence of mountain climbing is the experience of verticality, an experience that through the system of difficulty grading has become shareable. In her talk “Logos on Everest” Rachel Gross (Munich) followed the question of how specialized sports attire and equipment became everyday wear. Taking an approach that combines business history with the history of mountain climbing and outdoor clothing gave a great perspective to understand the development of sponsor-climber-partnerships over time and the effects of well-placed sponsorships during mountain tours with regards to increased popularity and profits. Jesse Ritner (Austin) looked at snow-making systems in his talk “Making Snow and Designing X-Games: Technological Innovation and the Production of a New Ski Culture.” Using the technology and history of snow-making as his trajectory, Ritner explored how the ever-presence of snow and its altered materiality changed the course of ski-tourism in the US since the late 1940s and ultimately led to the formation of a new subculture—snowboarding and extreme skiing—that is now on its way into the mainstream by way of commercialization as exemplified by the X-Games.

The status of Appalachia as one of the US mountain regions that are most present in the collective imaginary was well reflected in the conference program and showed a strong commitment to a cross-cultural, mountain-focused cooperation. Appalachia was not only represented in many panels and presentations that focused on this region, its history, geology, literature, and ecology, but also by the numerous scholars from the region who were present and shared their expertise in many conversations. The in-depth knowledge of the region became especially apparent in the panel discussion on Saturday night during which Jessie Blackburn, Associate Professor and Assistant Chair of the English Department at Appalachian State University, and Cameron D. Lippard, Chair of Sociology at Appalachian State University, presented on current re-formulations of Appalachian economics in relation to alcohol. Blackburn thematized Appalachian mountain vineyards and the way in which historical, cultural, regional, recreational, and environmental subjectivities are mediated in relation to wine making and tasting. “Bottling Steep Slopes” gave an excellent overview about these positive developments in the region but was also concerned with the difficulties of stigma and stereotypes that resonate with Appalachia. At the same time, she argued, wine tourism has to sell ‘nostalgic’ and ‘authentic’ notions of the region to stay profitable and to create a sense of heritage and the ‘posh rural’ that can be bottled and taken to the metropolitan areas. Nonetheless, said Blackburn, the wine industry offers a way out of the reliance on fossil capitalism.

Contrary to the expected longevity of wine making in Appalachia, the re-emergence of distilleries that produce moonshine can only be described as short-lived, according to Lampard. With the popularity of craft beer, there was also a found-again interest in making moonshine starting around 2008 when distilleries were legalized, Lippard stated during his talk “Modern Moonshine: the Revival of White Whiskey in the Twenty-First Century.” Moonshine with its connotations of prohibition, illegality, poverty, and individual legends presented a curios product to outsiders, who would buy an experience. Nowadays, however, many legal distilleries have to expand to making other forms of alcohol such as gin or rum; or have to put their moonshine into barrels in order to guarantee a more stable business model. In his talk, Lippard could relate the story of moonshine in Appalachia and its problematic past and present not just through rhetoric but also by offering ‘Original Appalachian Moonshine’ to an audience eager to learn.

The 46th annual conference of the AAAS on “Mediating Mountains” was an excellently organized, engaging event beautifully framed by the Alps and brought to life by an expert community interested in exchanging ideas and experiences. Christian Quendler and Cornelia Klecker did an outstanding job in hosting this event and the Advisory Committee selected great speakers and thought-provoking topics, thus providing a sound basis for all scholarly discussions.

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American Studies
news-243 Thu, 21 Nov 2019 12:57:19 +0100 The Congressional Record as a Scholarly Resource http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/the-congressional-record-as-a-scholarly-resource/ In case you missed the current impeachment hearings, we show you the sources where you can look it all up word by word. In tune with the current media hubbub around the beginning of the public hearings in the House's impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump last week, dubbed by various late night television hosts as a new daytime reality show, we want to show you the sources where you can actually look it all up word by word. As a public institution committed to transparency, The United States Congress offers a wide array of resources documenting its daily proceedings in the public domain.

The central organ which documents all debates and proceedings of the House of Representatives and the Senate is The Congressional Record, which began its publication in 1873. Those early volumes until 2015 are now available in digitized form. The most convenient way to access the current proceedings of both chambers online (1989 until today) is offered on the website of the United States Congress and also via an app for Apple devices.

The lawmaking proceedings reaching back to the first congress are contained in the Annals of Congress (1789 – 1824) available through the Library of Congress on the website “A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation,” where you can also find comprehensive documentation of the origins of the republic and the Continental Congress of 1774.

For those of you who are interested in the history of impeachment, you might want to delve into The Journal of the House of Representatives of March 2nd 1868 and the Journal of the Senate to look back upon how the first presidential impeachment trial against president Andrew Johnson unfolded. A comprehensive summary of the events can be found on the official United States Senate website.

For the latest updates and commentary on the current impeachment hearings, you might want to rely on your trustworthy news sources, but you can also follow the documentation on the website of the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence that conducts the impeachment hearings.

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American Studies
news-240 Mon, 24 Jun 2019 13:16:41 +0200 Bilder in wissenschaftlichen Publikationen http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/bilder-in-wissenschaftlichen-publikationen/ Korrekte Bildnachweise erstellen und Urheberrechtsverletzungen vermeiden - Tipps für die Praxis Das korrekte Verwenden und Nachweisen von Bildern im wissenschaftlichen Kontext ist nicht schwer, sofern die rechtlichen Rahmenbedingungen und der Verwendungszweck klar sind. In diesem Beitrag möchten wir Ihnen einige praktische Tipps geben, wie Sie schnell zu dieser Klarheit gelangen, Urheberrechtsverletzungen vermeiden, sich durch durch korrekte Bildnachweise absichern und Ihre Publikationen außerdem problemlos im Open Access zweitveröffentlichen können.

Wie finde ich heraus, ob ich das Bild benutzen darf?

Grundsätzlich brauchen Sie die Erlaubnis, ein Bild verwenden zu dürfen. Diese Erlaubnis kann in verschiedenen Formen vorliegen oder muss ggf. eingeholt werden. Im Folgenden listen wir einige typische Fälle auf und wie man jeweils damit verfährt.

Das Bild befindet sich ohne explizite Rechteangabe in einer gedruckten oder elektronischen Publikation.

Fragen Sie den Urheber des Bildes, sofern angegeben, ob Sie das Bild publizieren dürfen. Geben Sie den Verwendungszweck und die Art der Publikation an. Sollte der Urheber des Bildes nicht angegeben sein, wenden Sie sich mit Ihrer Frage an den Autor, den Herausgeber oder den Verlag und bitten ggf. um die Kontaktdaten des richtigen Ansprechpartners.

Das Bild befindet sich in der digitalen Sammlung einer Institution (Bibliothek, Archiv, Museum)

Auf den entsprechenden Webseiten finden Sie in der Regel einen Link zu den Nutzungsbedingungen. Richten Sie sich nach diesen Angaben und fragen im Zweifel bei der entsprechenden Institution nach.

Das Bild ist mit einer CC-Lizenz versehen.

Die CC-Lizenz erlaubt Ihnen die Verwendung des Bildes unter bestimmten Bedingungen, die Sie auf der Webseite von Creative Commons nachlesen können. Halten Sie sich an diese Bedingungen und geben Sie die Lizenz unbedingt im Bildnachweis mit an.

Keine Erlaubnis ist in den folgenden Fällen erforderlich:

Sie haben das Bild selbst gemacht.

Versehen Sie das Bild mit einem vollständigen Bildnachweis. Da Sie Urheber*in des Bildes sind, dürfen Sie ihm eine Lizenz zuweisen. Das ist empfehlenswert, weil Sie so anderen, die Ihr Bild weiterverwenden möchten, eindeutige Nutzungsbedingungen vorgeben. Vergeben Sie am besten eine CC-Lizenz.

Das Bild ist gemeinfrei.

Sie dürfen das Bild verwenden, sollten aber im Bildnachweis angeben, dass es gemeinfrei ist. Gemeinfrei ist ein Bild, wenn es entweder eindeutig durch die Lizenz CC0 als gemeinfrei bzw. Public Domain gekennzeichnet ist oder der Urheber des Bildes seit mindestens 70 Jahren tot ist.

  • Sonderfall: Wird z.B. ein gemeinfreies Gemälde von einem Fotografen abfotografiert, hat er die Urheberrechte an dem Foto – hier muss also der Fotograf persönlich oder durch eine Lizenz die Erlaubnis geben, das Foto zu verwenden, auch, wenn das abgebildete Gemälde gemeinfrei ist.

Welchem Zweck dient das Bild in der Publikation?

Grundlegend ist bei der Verwendung von Bildern in wissenschaftlichen Publikationen außerdem die Klärung der Frage, ob ein Bild zum Zitatzweck oder nur zur Illustration verwendet wird.

Bilder zum Zweck des Zitats (§ 51 UrhG)

Wenn Sie sich in Ihrer Publikation mit dem Bild selbst auseinandersetzen und es abbilden möchten, damit die Leser*innen Ihre Ausführungen zu dem Bild nachvollziehen können, verwenden Sie es zum Zweck des Zitats und dürfen es abbilden. Selbstverständlich müssen Sie es mit einem korrekten Bildnachweis versehen. Sie dürfen zum Zitatzweck auch Bilder in einer Publikation verwenden, deren Rechteinhaber sich alle Rechte vorbehalten haben.

Beispiel: Abbildung von Buchcovern bei Rezensionen

Cover sind in der Regel urheberrechtlich geschützt, weil sie eigens gestaltet werden und daher sog. „Schöpfungshöhe“ aufweisen. Wenn Sie eine Rezension schreiben und das Cover des besprochenen Buchs abbilden, unterliegt die Coverabbildung nur dann dem Zitatzweck, wenn Sie das Cover selbst auch besprechen, also z.B. untersuchen, in welchem Verhältnis die Symbolik der Covergestaltung zum Inhalt des Werks steht. In diesem Fall dürfen Sie das Cover mit Bildnachweis abbilden. Wenn Sie das Cover nicht besprechen, dient es nur der Illustration Ihres Beitrags. In diesem Fall müssen Sie die Erlaubnis vom Rechteinhaber, z.B. dem Verlag oder dem Gestalter, einholen.

Bilder zum Zweck der Illustration

Natürlich möchte man gerne, dass ein Artikel nicht nur gut ist, sondern auch gut aussieht. Bilder sind hierzu hervorragend geeignet. In diesem Fall verwendet man Bilder aber nur zur Illustration. Für jedes Bild, mit dem Sie sich nicht explizit in Ihrer Arbeit auseinandersetzen und das in Ihrer Publikation nur als visueller Begleiter fungiert, müssen Sie im Bildnachweis dokumentieren, dass Sie das Recht oder die Erlaubnis dazu besitzen, es abzubilden. Überlegen Sie also noch einmal, ob Sie das Bild wirklich benötigen.

Was gehört zu einem vollständigen Bildnachweis?

Zu einem vollständigen Bildnachweis gehören folgende Daten:

In einer elektronischen Publikation versehen Sie den Titel des Bildes mit einem direkten Link auf den Fundort, sofern der Fundort online ist. Die Lizenzangabe sollte wiederum direkt verlinkt sein mit der Zusammenfassung der Lizenzbedingungen. In einer gedruckten Publikation müssen Sie die Linktexte zusätzlich zur Nennung des Fundorts bzw. der Lizenz ausgeschrieben angeben.

Wenn Sie ein Bild nehmen und es für Ihre Publikation verändern, also ein Detail zeigen oder es verkleinern, ist es in den meisten Fällen erforderlich, dies anzugeben, z.B.

Photo: trent roche, peaceful ocean (resized, cropped), CC BY-NC 2.0

Bevor Sie dies tun, überprüfen Sie noch einmal die Nutzungsbedingungen, sofern es unter einer CC-Lizenz steht: Enthält diese die Komponente ND, dürfen Sie keinerlei Veränderungen an dem Bild vornehmen!

Auf unserer Webseite Publish in The Stacks haben wir Links zu weiteren hilfreichen Artikeln zur Verwendung von Materialien Dritter in Publikationen zusammengestellt, ebenso wie Tipps für das Auffinden von Bildern, die gemeinfrei sind oder unter freien Lizenzen stehen.

 

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American Studies Australian & New Zealand Studies Canadian Studies English / British & Irish Studies
news-235 Mon, 13 May 2019 13:46:27 +0200 adlr.link – Ressourcen für die Medienforschung http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/adlrlink-ressourcen-fuer-die-medienforschung/ adlr.link unterstützt Sie, wenn Sie zu Medien und Kommunikation forschen - unabhängig von Ihrer Fachrichtung. Seit 2014 entwickelt die Universitätsbibliothek Leipzig den Fachinformationsdienst (FID) adlr.link für Medien-, Kommunikations- und Filmwissenschaft als zentrales Literatur- und Rechercheportal. Der Dienst richtet sich dabei nicht nur an Forschende in den Medien-, Kommunikations- und Filmwissenschaften, sondern explizit auch an Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler, die etwa in der Anglistik oder Amerikanistik zu Hause sind und sich in ihrer Forschung mit Medien und Kommunikation befassen.

Wie unterstützt adlr.link Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler bei ihrer Forschung?

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American Studies Australian & New Zealand Studies Canadian Studies English / British & Irish Studies
news-230 Thu, 02 May 2019 14:28:36 +0200 We are hiring! http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/we-are-hiring/ The Library AAC is looking for new colleagues - join our Göttingen team! Projektmitarbeiterin / Projektmitarbeiter (w/m/d) E 13 TV-L

Die Niedersächsische Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Göttingen (SUB Göttingen) engagiert sich seit Jahren in nationalen und internationalen Projekten für die Schaffung von Infrastrukturen und Angeboten in den Bereichen wissenschaftliche Informationsversorgung, elektronisches Publizieren und Beförderung von Open Access.

In diesem Kontext suchen wir für den Abschluss der 1. und die 2. Projektphase (bis 31.12.2022) zum nächstmöglichen Zeitpunkt für das DFG-geförderte Projekt Fachinformationsdienst Anglo-American Culture (FID AAC) bis zum Laufzeitende des Projektes am 31.12.2022

1,5 Projektmitarbeiterinnen und Projektmitarbeiter (w/m/d) mit einem wissenschaftlichen Hochschulabschluss in Anglistik / Amerikanistik und / oder Politikwissenschaften (E 13 TV-L).

Die Stellen sind teilzeitgeeignet.

Ihre Aufgaben:

  • Fachspezifische Öffentlichkeitsarbeit und Durchführung von Workshops
  • Systematisches Einwerben von Dokumenten für das Fachrepositorium des FIDs
  • Unterstützung der Publikationsprozesse auf dem Fachrepositorium
  • Beratung zu Open Access
  • Vorbereitung der Digitalisierung von Schriftenreihen und vergriffenen Werken
  • Unterstützung anderer Projektaufgaben
  • Vertretungsaufgaben im Fachreferat Politikwissenschaften (Auswahl, Erschließung, Beratung, Vermittlung von Kenntnissen in der Informations- und Medienpraxis)

Erforderlich sind:

  • ein wissenschaftlicher Hochschulabschluss (Master, Promotion wäre wünschenswert) in Anglistik / Amerikanistik bzw. Großbritannien- / Amerikastudien und / oder Politikwissenschaften
  • Vertrautheit mit der Fach- und Publikationskultur der genannten Disziplinen
  • sehr gute Sprachkenntnisse in Deutsch und Englisch (mündlich und schriftlich)
  • sehr gute kommunikative Fähigkeiten in Wort und Schrift, Kundenorientierung, Teamgeist, selbständiges Arbeiten und Eigeninitiative

Wünschenswert sind:

  • Kenntnisse und Erfahrungen im Bereich wissenschaftlicher Informationsinfrastrukturen
  • Kenntnisse in Urheberrechtsfragen, Erfahrungen im Bereich Open Access
  • Erfahrungen in der Projektarbeit
  • Erfahrungen in der Öffentlichkeitsarbeit

Die Stelle erfordert eine Bereitschaft zu Dienstreisen innerhalb Deutschlands und des Auslands.

Informationen zum Projekt finden Sie auf der Website Fachinformationsdienst Anglo-American Culture (FID AAC). Rückfragen beantwortet Ihnen Frau Dorothea Schuller (E-Mail), +49 551 39-33494 (Tel.).

Die Universität Göttingen strebt in den Bereichen, in denen Frauen unterrepräsentiert sind, eine Erhöhung des Frauenanteils an und fordert daher qualifizierte Frauen nachdrücklich zur Bewerbung auf. Sie versteht sich zudem als familienfreundliche Hochschule und fördert die Vereinbarkeit von Wissenschaft / Beruf und Familie. Die Universität hat sich zum Ziel gesetzt, mehr schwerbehinderte Menschen zu beschäftigen. Bewerbungen Schwerbehinderter erhalten bei gleicher Qualifikation den Vorzug.

Bitte reichen Sie Ihre Bewerbung mit allen wichtigen Unterlagen in einem Dokument zusammengefasst bis zum 26.5.2019 ausschließlich über das Bewerbungsportal ein.

Im begründeten Ausnahmefall können Sie Ihre Unterlagen an die Direktion der Niedersächsischen Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Göttingen, Platz der Göttinger Sieben 1, 37073 Göttingen senden.

Hinweis:
Wir weisen darauf hin, dass die Einreichung der Bewerbung eine datenschutzrechtliche Einwilligung in die Verarbeitung Ihrer Bewerberdaten durch uns darstellt. Näheres zur Rechtsgrundlage und Datenverwendung finden Sie im Hinweisblatt zur Datenschutzgrundverordnung (DSGVO) (PDF 87,5 KB).

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American Studies Australian & New Zealand Studies Canadian Studies English / British & Irish Studies
news-224 Mon, 29 Apr 2019 13:50:23 +0200 Nicht nur vom Rio Grande bis Feuerland http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/nicht-nur-vom-rio-grande-bis-feuerland/ Der FID Lateinamerika, Karibik und Latino Studies und seine Angebote zum anglo-amerikanischen Raum Im Rahmen des DFG-Förderprogramms Fachinformationsdienste für die Wissenschaft baut das Ibero-Amerikanische Institut seit 2016 den Fachinformationsdienst (FID) Lateinamerika, Karibik und Latino Studies auf. Hier stehen neben der kontinuierlichen Erwerbung aktueller Publikationen im Rahmen einer e-preferred-Strategie forschungsrelevante, antiquarische Zeitschriften sowie große Datenbanken mit Zeitungen, Zeitschriften und weiteren Materialien im Volltext im Fokus. Weitere zentrale Punkte sind der Dialog mit der Wissenschaft, die enge Kooperation mit Fachverbänden, Universitäten und Forschungsinstituten und die Erprobung neuer Wege der Kommunikation zwischen Forschung und wissenschaftlichen Bibliotheken zur Informationsversorgung und zum Erwerb von benötigten Publikationen und Medien.

Eine besondere Herausforderung stellt die Multidisziplinarität dar: Wie kann der FID gleichzeitig die Forschenden im Bereich der Kulturanthropologie und in der Humangeographie, in der Archäologie und in der Philosophie erreichen? Auch die Zuschnitte der Wissenschaftsfelder befinden sich im Wandel: die Erforschung der Süd-Süd-Beziehungen, transregionale Studien und Migrationsforschung gewinnen neben der geographisch definierten Lateinamerikanistik und den thematisch eng umrissenen Chicano Studies zunehmend an Bedeutung.

So ist auf Workshops im Dialog mit Wissenschaftler*innen die Definition des FID Lateinamerika, Karibik und Latino Studies als multidisziplinärem und multilingualen Fachinformationsdienst entstanden, der die Forschung zu Lateinamerika und zur spanischsprachigen Bevölkerung der USA abdeckt, explizit die Karibik - auch mit ihren englisch-, französisch- und niederländischsprachigen Inseln - einschließt und sich den transregionalen Verflechtungen und globalen Migrationen widmet. Anglist*innen, Amerikanist*innen und alle anderen Geistes-, Kultur- und Sozialwissenschaftler*innen, die sich mit dem anglophonen Raum beschäftigen, finden im FID Lateinamerika, Karibik und Latino Studies beispielsweise Medien und Information zur anglophonen Karibik, zu den vielfältigen Verflechtungen Lateinamerikas mit den USA, zu historischen Themen der Auswanderung von Europa nach Amerika und zu aktuellen Fragen der Migration auf dem amerikanischen Kontinent. Die seit langem mit der SUB Göttingen bestehenden Erwerbungsabsprache und Kooperationen zu den Latino Studies wurden in das neue FID-Programm übernommen und sichern die Literaturversorgung zu diesem Gebiet.

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American Studies
news-219 Tue, 09 Apr 2019 15:18:26 +0200 historicum.net – Fachinformationsdienst Geschichtswissenschaft http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/historicumnet-fachinformationsdienst-geschichtswissenschaft/ Services auch für die Forschung zum angloamerikanischen Kulturraum Seit Januar 2016 bieten die Bayerische Staatsbibliothek und das Deutsche Museum – letzteres verantwortlich für die Subdisziplin Geschichte der Technik, Naturwissenschaften und Umwelt – im Fachinformationsdienst „historicum.net“ ein digitales Informationsangebot zum gesamten Spektrum der Geschichtswissenschaft ab dem Frühmittelalter an. Viele der digitalen Dienste sind auch für Forschende der Geschichte des angloamerikanischen Kulturraums von großem Interesse.

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American Studies Australian & New Zealand Studies Canadian Studies English / British & Irish Studies
news-214 Thu, 14 Mar 2019 13:34:00 +0100 Entdecken Sie die Angebote des FID Romanistik http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/entdecken-sie-die-angebote-des-fid-romanistik/ Frankokanadische Literatur, Angebote zum Forschungsdatenmanagement und Open Access-Publizieren Für romanistisch Forschende erwirbt der FID Romanistik umfassend Primär- und Sekundärliteratur. Einbezogen sind hier insbesondere auch die frankophonen Regionen Kanadas. Außerdem bieten wir Dienste an, die auch für andere Philologien bzw. für die Geisteswissenschaften interessant sind: Informieren Sie sich über Forschungsdatenmanagement und Open Access-Publizieren. Nutzen Sie dazu auch unsere Social Media-Kanäle!

Wir stellen Ihnen hier unsere Angebote vor, die alle über das Portal des FID Romanistik erreichbar sind:

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Canadian Studies
news-211 Wed, 23 Jan 2019 12:37:00 +0100 Library AAC Awarded Second Phase of Funding http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/library-aac-awarded-second-phase-of-funding/ We are continuing our services - and building a new collection! We are very happy to announce that the Library AAC's renewal proposal for a second three-year period has been successful. The project is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) as part of its "Specialised Information Services" programme (Fachinformationsdienste für die Wissenschaft) and is maintained by Göttingen State and University Library (SUB Göttingen) in cooperation with the Library of the John F. Kennedy Institute (JFKI) at FU Berlin. The Library of Anglo-American Culture & History is providing literature and information services for Germany-based scholars and students in all academic fields relating to the anglophone world (English Studies, British & Irish Studies, Anglophone Literatures & Cultures, Australian & New Zealand Studies, American Studies, Canadian Studies). We invite you to use our services:

  • Our collections: We continue to collect primary sources and specialist scholarly literature in the subject areas listed above. All items from our collections can be obtained via interlibrary loan.
  • Request It: If you need specialist literature, primary sources or other materials which are not available via the established German document delivery services, send us your requests!
  • Publish It: Publish or archive the results of your academic work in The Stacks, our Open Access subject repository, and make your research more visible.
  • Search: Explore the holdings of SUB Göttingen and the JFKI Library, search literature and sources, consult our search tips or reuse them for teaching.
  • NEW: Collection of British, Irish, Australian and New Zealand TV series: To complement the collection of North American TV series at the JFKI, SUB Göttingen will build a collection of British, Irish, Australian and New Zealand television series on DVD and Blu-ray Disc. Send us your suggestions via the request form or by e-mail!

We are looking forward to your requests, feedback and suggestions!

For the team of the Library AAC

Dorothea Schuller and Almut Breitenbach

 

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news-208 Tue, 18 Dec 2018 11:13:08 +0100 The Library as Research Instrument http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/the-library-as-research-instrument/ What Coleridge did in Göttingen - Maximiliaan van Woudenberg. Coleridge and Cosmopolitan Intellectualism 1794-1804: The Legacy of Göttingen University. London, New York: Routledge, 2018. Routledge Studies in Romanticism 23. Earlier this year, Maximiliaan van Woudenberg published a study on Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s 1799 stay in Göttingen. As the influence of this period on Coleridge’s life and work has been analysed with quite different results, van Woudenberg has choosen to reassess it by closely studying the relevant sources – including some so far unexamined primary records – against the backdrop of the Göttingen intellectual and historical context in which Coleridge worked. These aspects are viewed as a “constellation” – referring to the methodology of Konstellationsforschung – which influenced Coleridge's working process and intellectual interests.

Van Woudenberg describes Göttingen University Library as a central element in this constellation where Coleridge spent much of his time studying, searching for sources and transcribing. At the time, the Göttingen cataloguing system represented a brand-new research innovation with the Classified Catalogue (“Band-Realkatalog”) documenting the ongoing research processes in an encompassing range of subjects and disciplines. Van Woudenberg thoroughly studies the organisation of Göttingen University Library at the time and the way it was used, particularly describing the important role of the Classified Catalogue which displayed the research progress in a field. At the time, Coleridge might not have been allowed to access the catalogue by himself, so most likely he was assisted by a library custodian, as van Woudenberg points out. He shows how Coleridge was strongly influenced by working with the help of this tool, systematically gaining access to a wide array of sources which he otherwise might not have known of. The catalogue also demanded an understanding and the handling of the classification as a complex knowledge structure, the influence of which surfaces in Coleridge’s work even decades later, as the author shows. By closely tracing Coleridge’s working processes in different types of historical records, van Woudenberg’s study highlights in an impressive way how library collections and particularly the way in which access is provided to them influence or even shape the research methods of scholars.

If you would like to do what Coleridge did in Göttingen and browse our historical collections, use the electronic version of our old Classified Catalogue! If you are not in Göttingen, we are unfortunately not able to assist you personally, but we don’t leave you alone with this mighty tool: Use our guides on how to find your way through the historical classification system which you find in our subject-specific Search Tips (see “Browse the Historical Holdings [Works Published up to 1945])”!

Read van Woudenberg's excellent study:

Van Woudenberg, Maximiliaan. Coleridge and Cosmopolitan Intellectualism 1794-1804: The Legacy of Göttingen University. London, New York: Routledge, 2018. Routledge Studies in Romanticism 23. [SUB library catalogue entry]

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English / British & Irish Studies
news-205 Tue, 18 Sep 2018 18:49:00 +0200 Library AAC Has Opened The Stacks for You http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/library-aac-has-opened-the-stacks-for-you/ Publish and archive your research in The Stacks, our Open Access repository! Today we are launching The Stacks, our interdisciplinary Open Access repository. Researchers of American studies, Anglophone literatures & cultures, Australian & New Zealand studies, British & Irish studies, Canadian studies and English, including all sub-fields, are invited to publish and archive their articles and monographs as well as conference and seminar materials in The Stacks. Complete volumes of journals and other periodicals may also be archived. All items will be available in Open Access, either immediately or after a time span of your choice.

Make your research more visible and available worldwide by publishing it Open Access!

Visit The Stacks at thestacks.libaac.de and read more about publishing in our repository.

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news-198 Tue, 10 Jul 2018 17:42:39 +0200 Zur Wirkung der kanadischen Grundrechtecharta http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/zur-wirkung-der-kanadischen-grundrechtecharta/ Greene, Ian. The Charter of Rights and Freedoms: 30+ Years of Decisions that Shape Canadian Life. Toronto: James Lorimer & Company, 2014. Die kanadische Charta der Rechte und Freiheiten (Grundrechtecharta) hat seit ihrer Annahme als Teil der kanadischen Verfassung im Jahr 1982 grundlegend zur Verbesserung der Lebensumstände vieler Kanadier beigetragen. Sie verlangt, dass Gerichte das Für und Wider der Grundrechte eingehend abwägen, bevor sie ihre Entscheidungen treffen. Aufgrund der Charta wurde beispielsweise Strafgefangenen das Recht zur Teilnahme an Wahlen eingeräumt und die Behandlung des Kindersoldaten Omar Khadr durch die Harper-Regierung als Verletzung seiner Rechte angesehen.

Dieses Buch baut auf diesen und anderen Entscheidungen auf, um eine Vielzahl bedeutender Möglichkeiten darzustellen, wie das kanadische Leben in einer großen Bandbreite von Themen durch die Grundrechtecharta gestaltet wird. Auf diese Weise gibt es zum einen Einblicke in grundlegende Themen, die in der kanadischen Gesellschaft diskutiert werden. Zum anderen zeigt insbesondere das abschließende Kapitel eindrücklich, wie komplex und von vielen Faktoren abhängig die gesellschaftlichen und persönlichen Verhältnisse sind und dementsprechend schwer einschätzbar die Wirkung von Gesetzen auf diese ist. So konnte die Charta einige ihrer intendierten Ziele nicht oder nur unvollkommen erreichen, dafür aber andere Wirkungen erzielen, die zunächst nicht im Blick waren. Das Buch soll eine Einladung zu einer differenzierten und reflektierten Betrachtung der Wechselwirkung zwischen Grundrechten und Gesellschaft am Beispiel Kanadas sein – eine Betrachtungsweise, die heute vielleicht nötiger ist als je zuvor.

Jetzt verfügbar: [SUB library catalogue entry]

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Canadian Studies
news-196 Wed, 18 Apr 2018 18:42:20 +0200 Aus dem Alltag der Erwerbung in der Library AAC http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/aus-dem-alltag-der-erwerbung-in-der-library-aac/ ... oder: Was ist eigentlich eine FID-Collection? Anmerkungen am Beispiel von Robin O'Sullivan. American Organic. A Cultural History of Farming, Gardening, Shopping, and Eating. Lawrence, Kansas: University Press of Kansas, 2015. Wenn Bibliothekare ihre Sammlungen präsentieren, so sind es zumeist Cimelien oder mittlerweile auch gerne digitalisierte Sammlungen, auf alle Fälle aber aus dem Durchschnitt der wissenschaftlichen Sekundärliteratur herausfallende Stücke und Projekte, die vorgezeigt werden. Der Alltag der Arbeit für einen geisteswissenschaftlichen Fachinformationsdienst (FID) besteht aber - immer noch - vor allem auch aus der Sichtung der Masse der aktuellen Veröffentlichungen des einschlägigen Publikationsmarktes. Darunter sind dann Bücher wie American Organic von Robin O’Sullivan. Eine typische wissenschaftliche Monographie, die in einer mittleren amerikanischen University Press erschienen ist, gute Rezensionen erhalten hat (z.B. im Journal of American History, Bd. 103, 2017, S. 1064-1065) und - auch wenn diese Wertung natürlich sehr subjektiv ist - ein aus deutscher Sicht ausgesprochen interessantes und aktuelles Thema behandelt. USA und Öko-Landbau werden in der Regel in Deutschland nicht sofort assoziert.

Auch wenn man als Historiker das Buch interessant finden mag, so ist es nicht allein und nicht zuerst der Inhalt, den wiederum der Bibliothekar interessiert. Eine Frage, mit der man sich als FID-Bibliothekar auseinandersetzen muss, ist, wie viele andere Bibliotheken in Deutschland eigentlich das Buch ebenfalls erworben haben, da die mit Unterstützung der DFG finanzierte FID-Collection ja nur ergänzend für die spezialisierte Forschung und nicht vollständig sein soll und darf. Eine Recherche im KVK (Stand 15.2.2018) ergab, dass noch fünf andere Bibliotheken das Buch ebenfalls erworben haben. Das ist bei einer in einer University Press erschienenen, mehr oder weniger spezialisierten Monographie auch nicht weiter verwunderlich. In Berlin, Heidelberg, Köln, Mainz und Münster kann das Buch ebenfalls gelesen werden. Dass es gerade an diesen Orten zu finden ist, ist ebenfalls nicht erstaunlich, sind es doch alles Universitäten, wo es Professuren oder Sammlungsschwerpunkte zur amerikanischen Geschichte gibt. Ein genauerer Blick zeigt freilich, dass in Köln, Mainz und Münster die Bücher zu Präsenzbibliotheken gehören. Für Wissenschaftler, die an anderen Orten arbeiten, sind also nur noch - oder immerhin noch? - drei Exemplare übrig, die über die Fernleihe bestellt werden können; das des Göttinger FID’s sowie die in Berlin und Heidelberg vorhandenen.

Das Buch ist nicht nur ein Beispiel dafür, wie spezialisiert mittlerweile der geisteswissenschaftliche Publikationsmarkt geworden ist; es verweist ebenso darauf, dass ausländische wissenschaftliche Monographien, so interessant ihr Thema auch sein mag, häufig nur in wenigen Exemplaren an deutschen wissenschaftlichen Bibliotheken vorhanden sind. Reicht das für die Forschung in Deutschland aus? Die Frage ist schwer zu beantworten, als Bibliothekar kann man aber immerhin feststellen, dass die Fernleihe in den letzten Jahren in Deutschland sehr effizient geworden ist. In 8 bis 10 Tagen kann ein Buch nach einer Bestellung beim Leser sein, sofern natürlich nicht mehr als drei Wissenschafter gleichzeitig auf die Idee kommen, dass dieses Buch für sie interessant sein könnte. Gegenüber den Lieferfristen der 1980er oder frühen 1990er Jahre hat sich die Effizienz des Fernleihsystems also deutlich verbessert. Ein Faktor, der auch auf das Konzept eines FID zurückwirkt. Denn die Sammlung eines FID’s steht nicht mehr primär für sich selbst, sondern wird immer als Teil eines nationalen Systems gesehen. Aus Sicht der DFG, die 70% der Erwerbungskosten bei gedruckten Medien trägt, kann es auch nur darum gehen, die Forschung in Deutschland und nicht eine einzelne Sammlung zu unterstützen. Eine FID-Collection ist damit subsidiär zu sehen als eine Ergänzung zu den einschlägigen, in deutschen wissenschaftlichen Bibliotheken in größerem Umfang vorhandenen Titeln. Wer die Geschichte der modernen wissenschaftlichen Bibliotheken kennt, weiß, dass das per se nichts Neues ist. Die moderne Bibliothek hat sich schon immer als Teil eines Systems gesehen. Amerikanische Bibliothekare haben bereits in der zweiten Hälfte des 19. Jahrhunderts darüber geschrieben; und der Umfang der Fernleihe in preußischen Bibliotheken wurde um 1900 von amerikanischen Bibliothekaren durchaus als Vorbild verstanden. Der FID setzt dieses Konzept nur sichtlich akzentuierter um als die frühere Sondersammelgebietsbibliothek, die noch das Paradigma der möglichst vollständigen lokalen Sammlung mit dem der überregionalen Literaturversorgung verband.

Das Beispiel des Buchs American Organic zeigt damit, wie die Sammlung der Library AAC als FID-Collection funktioniert: Sie ist Teil eines Netzwerkes, Teil einer mittlerweile gut erschlossenen Landschaft wissenschaftlicher Bibliotheken in Deutschland. Und ihr primärer Zweck ist es, aus der gesamten, internationalen Buchproduktion die Bücher zu sammeln, die voraussichtlich von den meisten anderen Bibliotheken in Deutschland nicht (mehr) gekauft werden - und über das existierende Fernleihsystem den Lesern zur Verfügung zu stellen.

Diese selektive Sammlungspraxis ist zugleich - noch stärker als früher - auch eine verteilte Aufgabe zwischen Lesern und Bibliothekaren. Die vorausschauende Erwerbung für die FID-Collection durch die Bibliothekare ist nur eine Seite; die andere Seite ist, dass Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler damit stärker bei der Auswahl mitwirken können als früher. Alles, was sie benötigen, was aber in Deutschland nur schwer über die Fernleihe erreichbar ist - weil die Titel zum Beispiel vor allem in Institutsbibliotheken mit Präsenzbestand vorhanden sind - kann für die FID-Collection erworben werden. Sollte Ihnen also einmal trotzdem ein Buch oder einen Artikel nicht zugänglich sein, können Sie Ihren Wunsch an uns schicken und wir erwerben den Titel für Sie.

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American Studies Australian & New Zealand Studies Canadian Studies English / British & Irish Studies
news-192 Wed, 04 Apr 2018 18:10:13 +0200 Just licensed: 'Irish Newspaper Archives' http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/just-licensed-the-irish-newspaper-archives/ Explore Ireland's Past and Present! What’s happening in the Gaeltacht today? How did Oscar Wilde appear in the Irish press at his time? To answer questions like these and many more, delve into the 'Irish Newspaper Archives' which provide access to about 80 contemporary and historical Irish newspapers. With more than six million pages, this digital archive is the most encompassing full text database of Irish newspapers, covering the time span from 1753 until today.

We’ve just licensed it and all interested readers being affiliated to a German research institution can register free of charge. The database offers excellent search and browsing options. Read more about it!

 

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English / British & Irish Studies
news-186 Thu, 22 Feb 2018 15:35:49 +0100 ... and here are even more Canadiana! http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/new-canadiana-in-the-library-aac/ Many thanks to the Gesellschaft für Kanadastudien! Every year at the conference of the Gesellschaft für Kanadastudien in Grainau, recent publications on Canada are presented in a book fair. This year, the Library AAC and the FID Romanistik were so lucky to receive the books after the meeting. Today, the boxes arrived and we've justed unpacked them. Many, many thanks to the GKS!

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Canadian Studies
news-183 Wed, 14 Feb 2018 18:08:30 +0100 Browse Library AAC’s Canadiana http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/browse-library-aacs-canadiana/ Looking for a pastime on the train to Grainau? It’s a long ride to the venue of the Annual Conference of the Gesellschaft für Kanada-Studien in Grainau – how about browsing Canadiana in our catalogue on the way? Find a large selection here!

The Library AAC and FID Romanistik are looking foward to meeting you at the conference! If you want to learn more about our services, visit our workshop on Sunday, 9:00-10:30 in the ‘Friederspitz’ (Neue Angebote für Wissenschaftler*innen – was bieten Ihnen die Fachinformationsdienste (FIDs)? / New Services for Researchers – What Do the “Fachinformationsdienste” (FIDs) Offer? / Fachinformationsdienste für die Wissenschaft (FID) – Nouveaux services pour les chercheurs).

 

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news-173 Mon, 29 Jan 2018 12:23:33 +0100 Ein juristisches Standardwerk – aktueller denn je http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/ein-juristisches-standardwerk-aktueller-denn-je/ Freund, Ernst. Standards of American Legislation: An Estimate of Restrictive and Constructive Factors. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1917. In der heutigen, schnelllebigen Zeit scheinen "Deals" einen höheren Stellenwert zu besitzen als eine ausgewogene Bewertung von Vor- und Nachteilen sowie sonstigen Auswirkungen der Gesetzgebungsvorhaben auf alle Schichten der U.S.-amerikanischen Gesellschaft. Sollten diese Rechtsetzungsakte nicht gerade die Möglichkeit bieten, die verschiedenen, widerstreitenden Interessen gehaltvoll abzuwägen, indem spezialisierte Fachleute und Institutionen an den Verfahren beteiligt werden? Wer sich mit den Aufgaben und der Zusammensetzung des U.S-Kongresses beschäftigt, wird feststellen, dass gerade die Kontrolle des Präsidenten, der Exekutive und die Rechtsetzung die Hauptaufgaben dieses Gremiums sind (English 10–11). Eine Beteiligung des Kongresses beim Erlass umstrittener Gesetze sollte demnach die Regel, nicht die Ausnahme sein. Dies scheint dagegen unter einer Präsidentschaft in Frage zu stehen, die zu großen Teilen auf "Executive Orders" basiert (Peters und Woolley). Einmal erlassen, ist nur für wenige Fälle eine Überstimmung des Präsidialerlasses seitens des Kongresses wahrzunehmen, sei es aufgrund der Kostspieligkeit des notwendigen Revisionsverfahrens oder eines Vetos des Präsidenten (Schickler und Lee 805).

Obwohl das vorliegende Werk in den letzten Jahren etwas in Vergessenheit geraten ist, könnte Standards of American Legislation von Ernst Freund eine Orientierungshilfe gerade in der heutigen Zeit bieten. Dieses Standardwerk U.S.-amerikanischer Gesetzgebungslektüre stellt Richtlinien auf, die zwingend einzuhalten sind, um Gesetzgebungsvorhaben ausgewogen zu gestalten.

Der Ursprung des Buches erklärt seinen ganz eigenen Charakter: Es ist keine systematische Abhandlung, sondern vielmehr eine Aufsatzsammlung konstruktiver Kritik an bereits etablierten Gesetzgebungsgrundsätzen. Das Werk entstand als eine Reihe von Vorträgen, die 1915 an der Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland gehalten wurden. Der Autor schlägt eine Methode vor, um die etablierte Lehre des Verfassungsrechts zu ergänzen, die durch Negation und Revision Gesetzesnormen durchsetzt. Durch ein System positiver Grundsätze, die die Erarbeitung von Regelungen leiten, versucht das Werk, dem Begriff des ordnungsgemäßen Gesetzgebungsprozesses einen klareren Sinn und Inhalt zu geben.

Viel beachtet seit dem Erscheinen im Jahr 1917, gewann der Autor mit diesem Buch, welches sich nachfolgend als Standardwerk etablierte, 1919 den Ames-Preis der Harvard Law School, Ein Blick in dieses Werk ist jedem zu empfehlen, der sich auf die Werte einer ausgewogenen Gesetzgebung besinnen und möglicherweise Parallelen zu aktuellen Ereignissen ziehen möchte.

Über den Autor

Ernst Freund (1864–1932) war ein bekannter amerikanischer Rechtsgelehrter. Er erhielt den Doktortitel der Rechtswissenschaften von der Universität Heidelberg (1884) und einen Ph.D. in der Politikwissenschaft von der Columbia University (1897). In den Jahren 1894 bis 1902 war Freund Professor für Politikwissenschaft und von 1903 bis 1932 Professor für Rechtswissenschaften und Öffentliches Recht an der Universität von Chicago. Er ist maßgeblich für die Entwicklung des Verwaltungsrechts in den Vereinigten Staaten verantwortlich.

Werke

Freund, Ernst. The Legal Nature of Corporations. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1897.
[SUB library catalogue entry] [read it online]

Freund, Ernst. Jurisprudence and Legislation, St. Louis: 1904. [read it online]

Freund, Ernst. The Police Power: Public Policy and Constitutional Rights. Chicago: Callaghan, 1904. [read it online]

Freund, Ernst (with Heinrich Brunner). The Sources of English Law. Boston: Little, Brown, 1908. [read it online]

Freund, Ernst. Cases on Administrative Law Selected from Decisions of English and American Courts. American Casebook Series, St. Paul: West, 1911. [read it online]

Freund, Ernst. The Problem of Adequate Legislative Powers under State Constitutions. New York: Academy of Political Science, 1914. [read it online]

Freund, Ernst. Standards of American Legislation. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1917.
[SUB library catalogue entry] [read it online]

Freund, Ernst. The Growth of American Administrative Law. St. Louis: Thomas Law Book Co., 1923.[SUB library catalogue entry] [read it online]

Freund, Ernst. Administrative Powers over Persons and Property; a Comparative Survey. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1928.[SUB library catalogue entry]

Rezensionen

“We have seldom read an essay so philosophically and learnedly written and one which at the same time is extremely interesting as well as constructive. Mention is made of practically all our general classes of legislation during the last century, and in every instance we are treated with a learned historical review of the subject under consideration.” – American Law Review 52 (1918): 476. [SUB library catalogue entry]

“The great quality which Ernst Freund brought to the study of administrative law was his capacity for analysis. He was the Austin of the jurisprudence of administrative law.” – W.I.J., Law Quarterly Review 49 (1933): 588. [SUB library catalogue online]

Bibliographische Angaben

English, Ross M. The United States Congress. Manchester: Manchester UP, 2003. [SUB library catalogue entry] [read it online]

Schickler, Eric und Lee, Frances E., ed. The Oxford Handbook of the American Congress. New York: Oxford UP, 2011. [SUB library catalogue entry]

Peters, Gerhard und Woolley, John T. The American Presidency Project. 2017. 15. Januar 2018 <http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/data/orders.php>.

 

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American Studies
news-162 Mon, 01 Jan 2018 20:05:00 +0100 Mary Shelley’s "Hideous Progeny": Celebrating 200 Years of Frankenstein http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/mary-shelleys-hideous-progeny-celebrating-200-years-of-frankenstein/ We are kicking off the new year by commemorating the bicentennial of a modern myth. Published anonymously on January 1, 1818, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein or The Modern Prometheus fused elements of the Gothic novel with contemporary ideas about education and recent developments in natural philosophy to create one of the first and most consistently relevant science fiction stories. The tale of a young scientist who gives birth to and then abandons an artificial being has engendered not only a plethora of critical readings but has left an indelible mark on the popular culture of the 20th century and beyond. Like much of Gothic fiction, the narrative is imbued with a troubling and crucial ambiguity by presenting the points of view of both Frankenstein and his monster: Creator and creation are both victim and victimizer whose individual choices have propelled them on a relentless path of mutual destruction.

Frankenstein has been adapted for various media over the last two centuries. Most influential were James Whale’s two films for Universal studios, Frankenstein (1931) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935), starring Boris Karloff in one of cinema’s supremely iconic makeup designs. More recently, the TV series Penny Dreadful (2014-2016) poignantly imagined an alternative version of events in which Frankenstein does assume the role of nurturing parent to his bewildered and gentle creation only to have this re-writing of the story violently collide with Shelley’s original text in the form of the first-born monster’s vengeful return.

While film adaptations have often focused on the visual spectacle of the monstrous birth, the novel is characterized by its emphatic intertextuality (particularly its commentary on Milton’s Paradise Lost) and the importance of books for its characters. Indeed, for both Frankenstein and the creature the process of self-definition is achieved through reading.

With the rise of feminist criticism in the 1970s, Frankenstein has increasingly been read not just as a discussion of motherhood, parental abandonment and postpartum depression, but of the process of writing itself or, more specifically, as a way of exploring the notion of female authorship as something inherently monstrous. Indeed, in the introduction to the revised 1831 edition, Mary Shelley compares herself to Frankenstein, the creator of monstrous things. Yet unlike her male protagonist she professes affection for her creation and bids her “hideous progeny” (almost in anticipation of one of science fiction’s most famous greetings) to “go forth and prosper”.

 

Further Reading

A good place to start are these seminal essays from the late 1970s / early 1980s: 

Gilbert, Sandra M., and Susan Gubar: "Horror's Twin: Mary Shelley's Monstrous Eve". The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination. New Haven, CT: Yale UP, 1979, 213-47. [SUB library catalogue entry]

Johnson, Barbara. "My Monster / My Self." Diacritics 12 (1982): 2–10. 

Moers, Ellen. "Female Gothic." Literary Women: The Great Writers. New York, NY: Doubleday, 1976, 90-110. [SUB library catalogue entry]

Books from the SUB Göttingen collection depicted in the photo above:

Friedman, Lester D., and Allison Kavey. Monstrous Progeny: A History of the Frankenstein Narratives. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers UP, 2016. [SUB library catalogue entry]

Lochhead, Liz: Blood and Ice: The Story of the Creation of 'Frankenstein'. London: Hern, 2009. (Play dramatising the creation of Shelley's novel.) [SUB library catalogue entry]  

Spurr, David, and Nicolas Ducimetière, eds. Frankenstein: Créé des Ténèbres. Paris: Gallimard, 2016. (Exhibition catalogue.) [SUB library catalogue entry]

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English / British & Irish Studies
news-158 Thu, 21 Dec 2017 19:35:38 +0100 "And it came to pass in those days..." http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/and-it-came-to-pass-in-those-days/ From England to Göttingen - a tiny 14th century bible of English provenance Our Christmas image shows the familiar words of the Christmas gospel in Luke 2 in Latin ("Factum est autem in diebus illis..."), decorated with a red and blue fleuronné-initial in one of SUB Göttingen's Latin bibles. The 14th century manuscript of English origin is only 14,5 x 9,5 cm in size and was written on thin parchment in a tiny, very neat script. This bible is one of the many medieval books in SUB Göttingen's holdings which show traces of their history from the time of their early use until today.

Even though it is nearly impossible to reconstruct the complete history of a book of this age, a manuscript can still tell us something about its changing contexts and uses. Script, decoration, size and material point to the value, meaning and function of a book for its first owner as well as to its time and region of origin. Notes of its early readers can tell us something about their reactions to the text, personal entries allow to perceive fragments of lives long gone, ownership entries bring names, places and professions of readers into view. Fortunately, the encompassing library archive of SUB Göttingen often allows to reconstruct how a book came to be part of our holdings, uncovering another link in a long chain of different usage contexts.

The bible shows entries from around 1400 mentioning a family Theronde and was given to a monk of Winchcombe abbey by a man called Hugo Leye in 1512. In the 18th century the manuscript was owned by César de Missy (1703–1775), a theologian and chaplain of George III. César de Missy collected manuscripts of the bible for a new edition of the New Testament. This one he acquired in 1746, as his exlibris documents. After his death his collection was sold and the manuscripts are now kept in different libraries. SUB Göttingen owns four of the New Testament scholar's medieval manuscripts, three of which were given to the library by Johann Reinhold Forster (1729-1798) in 1776.

Tracing the little medieval bible's history thus leads us right into the circles of London scholars in the 18th century, showing how the book's readerships and usage contexts changed over time. The single steps of this bible's history remain still to be examined in detail, which will happen in our current manuscript cataloguing project.

The Library AAC team wishes you a merry Christmas and a happy New Year!

 


Notes

Manuscript shelf mark: 8° Cod. ms. theol. 4 Cim. - Suggest it for digitization

Medieval manuscripts from César de Missy's collection in SUB Göttingen:

4° Cod. ms. theol. 33 (Greek lectionary, 15th century)
4° Cod. ms. theol. 50 (Letters of St. Paul, 13th/14th century)
8° Cod. ms. theol. 3 Cim. (Latin bible, 14th century)
8° Cod. ms. theol. 4 Cim. (Latin bible, 14th century)

Look them up in our manuscript catalogue.

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English / British & Irish Studies
news-156 Sat, 09 Dec 2017 10:15:00 +0100 "Paradise Lost" als lyrische Fundgrube http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/paradise-lost-als-lyrische-fundgrube/ Anlässlich Miltons Geburtstag: Zur Neuauflage von Ronald Johnsons "Radi os" (1977). "Radi os" - der Titel dieses Gedichts von 1977 des amerikanischen Schriftstellers Ronald Johnson ist ein melodisches Überbleibsel der zwei Wörter "Paradise Lost". Denn das epische Gedicht von John Milton aus dem Jahr 1667 ist der Prätext, aus dem Johnsons Werk mit den Mitteln der erasure poetry gewonnen wurde, bei der aus vorgefundenen Texten Teile ‘gelöscht’ werden. In "Radi os" wurden die Leerstellen beibehalten, die die Worte Miltons hinterlassen haben. Sie setzen Johnsons Gedicht in ein ungewöhnliches visuelles Spannungsverhältnis mit der Buchseite und verweisen konstant auf seine literarische Vorlage.

Ein kurzer Blick auf die Forschungsliteratur zeigt die Vielfalt der Themen und Ideen, die in Bezug auf Johnsons Gedicht diskutiert werden, wie zum Beispiel die Beziehung Johnsons zu dichterischen Vorbildern wie Milton und Blake, die Gemeinsamkeiten seiner literarischen Methode mit dem von Blake genutzten Verfahren der Ätz-Radierung oder die Verortung des Gedichts in der amerikanischen Literaturgeschichte. Johnsons Gedicht wird einerseits als poetische Neuschöpfung betrachtet, andererseits eher als die Arbeit eines Editors als die eines Autors.

"Radi os" befindet sich also im Zentrum vieler Themen und Fragen, die die Arbeit von Literaturwissenschaftler*innen und Literaturhistoriker*innen in den letzten Jahrzehnten bestimmt haben. Es bietet gleichsam einen erhöhten Punkt, von dem aus weite Forschungsfelder wie Intertextualität und Autorschaft überblickt werden und Fragen zu Genre, zum Begriff der Postmoderne oder zur Rezeption von kanonischer Literatur verhandelt werden können.

Für die Neuauflage des Gedichts von 2005 wurde ein Detail aus Blakes Gemälde "Satan Watching the Endearments of Adam and Eve" (1807) für die Covergestaltung verwendet, der mehrere Illustrationsserien zu Miltons Werk geschaffen hat.

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American Studies English / British & Irish Studies
news-149 Fri, 08 Dec 2017 18:13:00 +0100 New: Data Management Tips http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/new-data-management-tips/ How is your data? Do you have a system for managing your files? Check out our data management pages for tips on naming, organising, securing and re-using your files. Make your work run even more smoothly and avoid unpleasant surprises like data confusion and loss!

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news-151 Wed, 06 Dec 2017 11:32:07 +0100 Digitalcourage's Advent Calendar http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/digitalcourages-advent-calendar/ Discover 24 tips for digital self-defence! Digitalcourage e.V. has set up a great advent calendar, presenting useful background information on our everyday digital experiences, offering tips and sustainable alternatives. The Library AAC team is already reading eagerly! Curious? https://digitalcourage.de/adventskalender.

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news-117 Tue, 31 Oct 2017 12:06:00 +0100 Happy Halloween! http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/happy-halloween/ Get into a spooky mood with horror anthologies from our collections! SUB Göttingen owns a significant collection of anglophone literature of the fantastic, including both scholarly publications and historical as well as contemporary primary sources. Browse our catalogue for horror, fantasy and science fiction anthologies for a selection of Gothic classics, ghost stories and tales of the weird and uncanny by English-language writers from around the world: Trick or read! All of these books can be ordered via interlibrary loan. Please do not hesitate to suggest books for purchase which are currently not accessible via the established German document delivery services. We are happy to offer support to all researchers based in the fields of Gothic, Horror or Monster Studies - all year round!

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American Studies Australian & New Zealand Studies Canadian Studies English / British & Irish Studies
news-18 Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:16:00 +0200 New World, New Media: Christopher Columbus’s 1493 Letter on His First Voyage http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/new-world-new-media-christopher-columbuss-1493-letter-on-his-first-voyage/ Discover the two Göttingen copies of the 1493 Columbus letter detailing his first voyage. Arguably the most famous and consequential travel narrative, Christopher Columbus’s report of his first voyage and his ‘discovery’ of several islands (he made landfall in the Bahamas) not only marks the start of the age of colonial exploration but also demonstrates the extensive power of the emerging print medium for quickly disseminating news from around the world and creating a shared present for the cultural centres of early modern Europe.

Upon his return in March 1493, Columbus posted a letter (written while still on board the Niña) addressed to the Spanish courtier Luis de Santángel who had been instrumental in supporting the voyage. The document was quickly translated into several languages and published in various editions across Europe within the next few months, making it a bestseller of the early print culture. It contains information on the people he encountered (described as handsome, timorous yet acutely intelligent) and on the economic possibilities of the various islands rich in spices, gold mines and fertile fields.

The contents of another letter, sent to King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain, were lost until 1989 when a transcription of a 16th-century manuscript, including a copy of the letter, was published as Libro copiador de Cristóbal Colón. The letters differ in important ways: For instance, the published letter seems to be deliberately vague about the precise location of the islands described, probably in an effort to put potential rival explorers off the scent. An earlier letter, written during a terrible storm, was wrapped in cloth and thrown into the sea in a barrel to guard against the possibility of news of the voyage being lost with the ship. It never arrived.

SUB Göttingen holds two distinct editions of the published Columbus letter.

1. Columbus, Christophorus. Epistola de insulis nuper inventis (Latin, tr. by Leandro di Cosco, 29 Apr. 1493). Paris: In campo Gaillardi (Guy Marchant), [after 29 Apr. 1493]. ISTC ic00761000; GW 7175; Kind (Göttingen) 813 (A); 8 H AM I, 502 INC RARA.

The Göttingen copy belongs to the earliest of the Paris editions of the Latin translation printed in 1493 by Guy Marchant. Unlike the other Paris editions it does not contain a woodcut and the title is phrased slightly differently (Epistola de insulis repertis de novo). The only other known copy of this edition is held at the Royal Library of Turin. You can view the digitized version of the Göttingen copy here

2. Verardus, Carolus. Historia Baetica. Add: Christophorus Columbus: De insulis nuper in mare Indico repertis. [Basel]: J[ohann] B[ergmann de Olpe], 1494. ISTC iv00125000; GW M49579; Kind (Göttingen) 849; 8 TH IREN 12/10 (3) INC.

The Basle edition of 1494 is characterized by several detailed woodcut illustrations, some of which were recycled and recontextualized from earlier works. It was published together with a history of the conquest of Granada, written by Carolus Verardus.

Like other forms of colonial writing, Columbus’s letter is a political performance driven by various agendas such as the need to secure further funding for a second voyage to what he still believed were the outer reaches of Asia. The letter not only became a template for other reports of exploration but – as part of the growing colonial discourse – also influenced literary works, especially through its memorable descriptions of the looks and habits of a strange people living in a New World. 

Shakespeare’s The Tempest has been linked to accounts of the New World since the 19th century, yet attitudes towards Prospero, as towards Columbus, have changed significantly in the last few decades. Critics have increasingly focused on The Tempest’s topicality and complex staging of the colonial encounter and analysed the play within the theoretical frameworks of New Historicism and Postcolonial Studies, focusing on the power relations between the European and native characters (Caliban and Ariel).

When Caliban asks the drunken butler Stephano “Hast thou not dropped from the heaven?” it is tempting to read this as a direct allusion to – if not parody of – Columbus’s report of the natives’ response to the arrival of the Spaniards: “They do not hold any creed nor are they idolaters; only they all believe that power and good are in the heavens and are very firmly convinced that I, with these ships and men, came from the heavens, and in this belief they everywhere received me after they had mastered their fear.”

While the language of exploration and conquest of the early modern period often made use of sexual imagery by depicting America and other ‘virgin lands’ as desirable women, John Donne uses the theme of colonial discovery as one the central (bawdy) conceits in his Elegy XIX “To His Mistress Going to Bed”:

O my America! My new-found-land,
My kingdom, safeliest when with one man manned,
My mine of precious stones! My empery!
How blessed am I in this discovering thee!

(Unlike Columbus's letter and despite the growing importance of print culture in Tudor England, Donne’s poetic work was circulated in manuscript form among friends and only published posthumously. SUB Göttingen owns the 1633 first edition of Donne's poems as well as the 1669 edition which first included Elegy XIX, deemed too indecent by the earlier publisher:)

As Donne’s poem reveals, the thrill of exploration and dis-covery also carries the shadow of dominance and exploitation, both economic and sexual. Protests around Columbus Day celebrations in the United States have been growing over the last years. Recently, Los Angeles has become the latest city to replace Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples’ Day

 

Further Reading

The website of the Osher Map Library offers information on the Basle 1494 edition and on the rapid dissemination of the various edition of the Columbus letter throughout Europe. 

Read Cecil Jane's English translation of the letter which is quoted above.

On his TV show Last Week Tonight, John Oliver asked in 2014: "Columbus Day - How Is This Still a Thing?"

Chiappelli, Fredi, ed. First Images of America: The Impact of the New World on the Old. 2 vols. Berkeley, CA: U of California P, 1976. [SUB library catalogue entry]

Greenblatt, Stephen. Learning to Curse: Essays in Early Modern Culture. New York, NY: Routledge, 2007. Routledge Classics. [SUB library catalogue entry]

Harrisse, Henry: "The Early Paris Editions of Columbus’s First 'Epistola'." Zentralblatt für Bibliothekswesen 1893, 3: 118-121. [read it online] 

Hart, Jonathan. Columbus, Shakespeare and the Interpretation of the New World. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. [SUB library catalogue entry]

Young, R.V.: "'O My America, My New-Found-Land’: Pornography and Imperial Politics in Donne's Elegies." South Central Review 4, 2 (1987): 35-48. DOI: 10.2307/3189162

Zamora, Margarita. Reading Columbus. Berkeley: U of California P, 1993. [SUB library catalogue entry]

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American Studies
news-83 Fri, 20 Oct 2017 18:14:00 +0200 Ideals and Ideologies http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/ideals-and-ideologies/ Read about gender, madness and colonial paranoia in Australian literature. Looking through our most recent acquisitions the title Gender, Madness, and Colonial Paranoia in Australian Literature: Australian Psychoses by Laura Deane raised my curiosity. Deane analyses the trope of madness in novels by two Australian female writers, Christina Stead (1902-1983): The Man who Loved Children and Kate Grenville (*1950): Lilian’s Story and Dark Places. Deane analyses madness within the specific social and cultural contexts which form the setting of the three novels, resisting to view madness as the province of women. Instead, she carefully analyses how the respective protagonists react to their surroundings – particularly their deformed family structures. These are read against the backdrop of the gender and family ideals of Australian (post)colonial culture which forms the historical context of the novels’ plots. The forms of madness in these novels, Deane argues, are rooted deeply in the madness of the colonial enterprise, of gender ideals having become ideologies which produce destructive forms of dominance.

Laura Deane’s study reminded me of two booklets which advertise Australia to prospective British settlers: Australia for the British Boy and Australia for the Farm Labourer. SUB Göttingen received a number of these publications lately and they intrigued me as rather extraordinary historical sources. The covers of the two booklets, which you see on the image above, show visual configurations of gender and family ideals. Inside, we read how Australia was presented to the young, male readers, what was promised them and what was seen as their preconditions for being successful: "She" (Australia) will generously award the man on the land, “possesses millions of fertile acres yet untilled” and is about to make great economic progress. The men are promised to soon be able to be their own boss, to make their own way: The promised life seems to be a one-way street where independence and self-determination is the main goal and economic prosperity the most important achievement. To be successful in Australia, the men have to be thrifty, work hard and intelligently and be of “stubborn determination”, as one of the booklets states.

Thus, the booklets draw attention to aspects of the colonial society’s formation, to the settlers’ expectations and intentions. As such, they represent an earlier point in the development from ideal to ideology, resulting in the deformed families and troubled personalities the novels analysed by Laura Deane put into the readers' view.

Bibliographic Notes

Deane, Laura. Gender, Madness, and Colonial Paranoia in Australian Literature: Australian Psychoses. Lanham, Boulder, New York: Lexington, 2017. [SUB library catalogue entry]

Stead, Christina. The man who loved children. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1940. [SUB library catalogue entry]

Grenville, Kate. Lilian's story. Sydney: Allen and Unwin, 1985. [SUB library catalogue entry]

Grenville, Kate. Dark places. London et al., Picador, 1994. [SUB library catalogue entry]

Development and Migration Commission. Australia for the British Boy. Melbourne: Modern Printing, 1925. [SUB library catalogue entry]

Office of Local Government. Australia for the Farm Labourer. Melbourne: Modern Printing, 1925. [SUB library catalogue entry]

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Australian & New Zealand Studies
news-30 Fri, 20 Oct 2017 14:56:00 +0200 Web Forms for Literature Requests and Digitisation on Demand http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/web-forms-for-literature-requests-and-digitisation-on-demand/ When access to literature is getting difficult: Send us your literature requests and suggestions for digitisation! If you are a researcher or student working in the fields of English, British and Irish Studies, American Studies, Canadian Studies or Australian and New Zealand Studies and require primary or secondary literature which is not available via the standard German document delivery services (inter-library loan) you can submit your purchase requests via our webform.

You can also suggest items relevant for your research from the holdings of Göttingen State and University Library and the Library of the English Department of Göttingen University for digitization, provided they are in the public domain in Germany.

If you require a specific bibliographic or full text database for your research and would like us to negotiate a licence agreement, please send us your database recommendation.

The Library AAC team is looking forward to your suggestions!

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news-64 Thu, 19 Oct 2017 15:57:00 +0200 Medieval Craft Recipe Books http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/medieval-craft-recipe-books/ New edition: Middle English recipes for painters, stainers, scribes and illuminators At first glance, medieval craft recipes seem to be a rather peculiar subject to deal with. Indeed, their study requires quite special competences: Scholars need a profound knowledge of the history of the crafts, their working processes as well as of palaeography, codicology, medieval manuscript culture in general and an excellent understanding of Middle English to master the sometimes scanty, jotted down texts with their very special terminology, and last but not least, excellent Latin. An expert on medieval craft books is Mark Clarke, whose edition of all known Middle English technical recipe texts for painters, stainers, scribes and illuminators (The crafte of lymmyng and the maner of steynyng: Middle English recipes for painters, stainers, scribes, and illuminators) appeared in 2016.

This edition, which we purchased lately, enormously improves access to this vast field of technical recipes – and raises curiosity: In which ways can such highly specialised texts contribute to our understanding of medieval culture? Let’s take a closer look!

An article of the same author offers a very informative and useful introduction to medieval craft books (Clarke 2013, see below). It shows that, next to informing about the particular working processes, the study of such craft recipe books and texts highlights essential questions every scholar is confronted with when dealing with the manuscript transmission of medieval literature, particularly if it is in the vernacular and of a didactic nature, for example: Was a text composed in the vernacular or is it a translation from Latin? In how far do Latin and vernacular texts on the same topic differ? Does a text preserve traditional knowledge or communicate new findings? What might have been a related oral and mnemonic tradition and in how far does the text reflect aspects of it? Who was it written for and who else was interested in it? What does it say about the literacy of certain social groups? What does its transmission tell about the dissemination of knowledge from a professional to a lay context? Is a text transmitted in a manuscript as a literary document or was it used as an instruction?

The holdings of SUB Göttingen, for example, comprise a craft book of around 1450 which was evidentially used: The Göttingen Model Book (Göttinger Musterbuch, 8 Cod. Ms. Uff. 51 Cim.). Next to recipes for pigments it contains step-by-step instructions for painting acanthus decorations and chequered background patterns, accompanied by example paintings. The evidence of its use is also in our holdings: It is the Göttingen exemplar of the 42-line Gutenberg Bible (2 Bibl. I, 5955 Inc. Rara Cim.) whose decorations are clearly based on the Model Book (view Model Book and Gutenberg Bible online).

This being an exceptional clear piece of evidence, in general dealing with the questions above demands a lot of research and experience. But, as the studies of craft books in manuscripts show, it is worth it: Next to providing important information for book conservation and craft history, they can contribute to diverse research topics in book history, art history, the study of didactic literature as well as social history.

 

Bibliographic Notes and Further Reading

Clarke, Mark. The Crafte of Lymmyng and the Maner of Steynyng: Middle English Recipes for Painters, Stainers, Scribes, and Illuminators. First edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Early English Text Society O.S 347. [SUB library catalogue entry]

Clarke, Mark. “Late Medieval Artist's Books (14th-15th Centuries).” Craft Treatises and Handbooks: The Dissemination of Technical Knowledge in the Middle Ages. Ed. Ricardo La Córdoba de Llave. Turnhout: Brepols, 2013. 33–53. De Diversis Artibus (DDA) 91 = N.S., 54. [SUB library catalogue entry]

Oltrogge, Doris. “Recipe Books for Illuminators in 15th Century Germany and Netherlands: Workshop Practice and Encyclopedic Ambition.” Craft Treatises and Handbooks: The Dissemination of Technical Knowledge in the Middle Ages. Ed. Ricardo La Córdoba de Llave. Turnhout: Brepols, 2013. 55–68. De Diversis Artibus (DDA) 91 = N.S., 54. [SUB library catalogue entry]

Datenbank mittelalterlicher und frühneuzeitlicher kunsttechnologischer Rezepte in handschriftlicher Überlieferung (TH Köln).

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English / British & Irish Studies
news-46 Wed, 18 Oct 2017 16:44:00 +0200 “To Men and Women of Energy and Ambition” http://aac.sub.uni-goettingen.de/home/full-view-post/detail/News/to-men-and-women-of-energy-and-ambition/ From immigration regulations to soap and towels on the train: Information brochure for settlers to Canada, 1924 Canada is one of the countries advertised in a collection of information brochures from the early 20th century lately obtained by SUB Göttingen. The leaflets address tourists and potential settlers mainly to Australia, New Zealand and Canada.

The booklet titled Canada West. Canada – The New Homeland was issued by the direction of the Canadian Minister of Immigration and Colonization in 1924 and belongs to a series of publications advertising the Canadian Prairie Provinces to prospective settlers. It displays the excellent conditions of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia for grain farming, stock raising and dairying in a way which must have been quite tempting to any farmer who loved his profession. Starting with the Immigration Regulations and the personal preconditions asked for, encompassing information is provided. An outline of Canada’s landscape and farming conditions, education system and social conditions are followed by detailed, yet concise descriptions of the four provinces, touching on every aspect a farmer would want to know about his future home country – including opportunities for amusement and recreation. Illustrations and maps impart first visual impressions of the “promised land”.

The booklet is structured thoughtfully and aims to make it as easy for the potential settler as possible – even the course of the journey to Canada is described, accompanied by practical tips as how to pack and prepare one's baggage, what to wear, what to take on the train journey through Canada and where and how food can be obtained on the way. The brochure documents vividly how Canada presented itself at the time to the addressed "men and women of energy and ambition": An abundant, thriving, beautiful, caring and inviting country.

Source types like these information brochures can be rare – the one described is unique in Germany.

Canada West: Canada, the New Homeland. Ottawa: Dept. of Immigration and Colonization, 1924. [SUB library catalogue entry] - Suggest it for digitization

 

Further Reading

For an overview and a critical analysis of the advertising campaign and its publications particularly after 1896 see

Moir, Lindsay. “Canada West: The New Homeland.” Art Libraries Journal 24.3 (1999): 12–18.

Lindsay Moir is Senior Librarian at Glenbow Museum Library, Calgary which owns an encompassing collection of Western Canadiana.

View an online exhibition on the Canadian advertising campaigns hosted by the Canadian Museum of History - Musée Canadien de l'Histoire: The Last Best West: Advertising for Immigrants to Western Canada, 1870-1930.

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Canadian Studies